Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Of Love and Self-Sacrifice

I finally got to see the new Beauty and the Beast with Emma Watson and Dan Stevens. After turning in a manuscript, I took a “Me Day” to reward myself. Two friends joined me, and there we were, three middle-aged women at 10:40 in the morning enjoying a child’s tale. But it is oh, so much more than that—due, in particular, to the well-rounded development of the characters.


While working on the Tree Plotter for Beauty and the Beast, (call it a hobby, called it a disorder,) I wanted to get the inner journeys of both of the main characters. This is a romance, and to craft a well-rounded romance, we must develop both characters equally. This is also called a 50/50 romance where each character shares 100% of the story.

A good romance, I believe, works when the theme applies to both characters. In fact, this should be true for any story where characters share importance. At first, I had different themes for both characters. This is okay, to a point, because there could be several themes in a story. One of Belle’s themes could be “Love Beyond All Faults.” Beast’s could be “Open the Heart.” But the theme that works for each is “Self-Sacrifice.” This overall theme is what drives the story, and shows up over and over.

Here is the Tree-Plotter for Belle:
  • THEME: Self-Sacrifice
  • INNER NEED: To accept herself as she is despite the villagers calling her odd.
  • INCITING INCIDENT: Sacrifices for her father and shoves him out of the cell to take his place.
  • TENT POLE: Beast attacked by wolves while saving her.
    • Death: Beast almost dies.
    • Connection to Theme: See's through his self-sacrifice that he's not the beast she thought he was.
  • BLEAKEST MOMENT: Sacrificed her safety to warn the Beast, but he is still mortally wounded and she tells him she will never leave him again.
    • Reflection of Inciting Incident: Was once a prisoner but has now returned out of love.
  • LESSON/DECISION: Has learned, through the love a beast, to embrace who she is.
    • Reflection of Inner Need: Because she's found a kindred spirit, she can now accept herself.



Here is the Tree-Plotter for Beast:
  • THEME: Self-Sacrifice
  • INNER NEED: Put others before himself
  • INCITING INCIDENT: Intruders
  • TENT POLE: Saves Belle from wolves and almost dies.
    • Death: Nearly dies
    • Connection to Theme: Sacrifices himself
  • BLEAKEST MOMENT: Belle leaves and apparently sends the villagers to kill him.
    • Reflection of Inciting Incident: More intruders, and they're bent on killing him.
  • LESSON/DECISION: Has learned that he is a better man when he puts the needs of others before himself.
    • Reflection of Inner Need: Puts others before himself





My take away: To write a tale as old as time, it's always good to strengthen the theme in a way that affects both characters.


Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Destiny vs Secret Desire

When it comes to human nature, Destiny almost always loses to Secret Desire. As we see in La La Land, even though two people appear destined to be together, nothing is stronger at getting it's own way than that urge living deep within us, our Inner Need, sometimes buried so deep that we don't even know it's there until it's forced from hiding. At this point, it is called the Secret Desire.

Mia, played by Emma Stone, and Sebastian, played by Ryan Gosling, seem to be the perfect romantic couple. There are lots of sparks in their relationship, but often the typical romance taps into the Inner Need of the characters and fulfills whatever is missing in their lives. Not so much in real life, and La La Land depicts this, much to the consternation of it's audience (aka, me.) Did I want to see these two together? Absolutely! I write romance. I've gotten several couples together successfully. But this movie, as fantastical as it is, (dancing, singing. . .floating,) was written to portray real life. Well, some real life. Obviously some of us have had successful romance stories. I'm going on 42 years with the love of my life.

The following Tree Plotter gives us some insight as to the Inner Needs of these two characters. My take: When writing a story with real life emotions, tap into the Secret Desire and make the character's dream stronger than whatever Destiny might have planned for them.

Mia:

Sebastian:

Click on images to enlarge.

It may be cynical, but the lesson our two characters learn is, "Here's to the fools who dream." 

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

HIDDEN FIGURES - Tree Plotter

HIDDEN FIGURES - Tree Plotter

The following is a breakdown of Hidden Figures following the character of Katherine.

CHARACTER: Katherine
THEME: Equality
SECRET DESIRE: To be accepted in the world in which she lives.
INCITING INCIDENT: NASA assigns her to the Space Task Group.
TENT POLE MOMENT: Tells everyone about the bathroom and the indignities of being colored.
DEATH IN THE MIDDLE: After her eruption, her boss, Al Harrison, finally gets it and ends the segregation in his department, declaring, "Here at NASA, we all pee the same color." Thus, it's the death of segregation.
CONNECTING TENT POLE WITH THEME: The theme is equality. With the tearing down of the Colored Only bathroom sign, NASA declares that all people are equal.
BLEAKEST MOMENT: Now that Friendship 7 is about to launch, Katherine's job is no longer needed. But a problem arises and she ultimately saves the mission, but when she hands the book with the correct figures needed to launch to her advocate, Al Harrison, he quickly takes it, then shuts the door to the control room in her face. Once again she's considered too inferior to participate at the same level as her peers.
CONNECTING BLEAKEST MOMENT WITH INCITING INCIDENT: She had been promoted to the Space Task Group, but now it has ended with no more acceptance than she'd had at the beginning.
LESSON: She has recognized value in the space program
CONNECTING THE LESSON WITH THE SECRET DESIRE: She desires equality, and in the end, she learns that standing up for herself and being the best she can be has earned the respect of her peers.





Friday, March 24, 2017

Hidden Figures vs La La Land



When these two movies first came out, it was around Valentine’s Day. I asked Hubs to take me to the see Hidden Figures because I didn’t think a singing and dancing musical would be his thing. But, he surprised me the next day by asking if I’d like to see La La Land, too. Um, yeah!

I enjoyed both movies, but definitely one over the other. As the week wore on, I puzzled over this because that’s what I do now that I’ve begun learning how to write. It’s ruined movies for me, and yet enhanced them at the same time.

My conclusion was that, as far as I could tell, Hidden Figures had deeper needs than La La Land. Very strong goals for both, but really, what did the characters in La La Land need?

Let's first look at Hidden Figures. The real life Katherine Johnson is portrayed by Taraji P. Henson. Katherine’s Secret Desire is acceptance. It is noted that all three of the leads have this Inner Need. She proves this during her much-deserved tirade after Al Harrison, played by Kevin Costner, asks why she’s gone from her desk so long every day. Once she lays it all out for him, how she has walk to the “colored” restroom a half a mile away, can only drink out of the “colored only” coffee pot someone has placed next to the other one, and how she can’t afford pearls, the only jewelry she’s been told is acceptable at NASA, she finally gets the respect she deserves from her boss, who up until now has been clueless. She still has an uphill battle, but this scene brings home her Inner Need (aka, Secret Desire.) To be accepted by her peers. A strong case, I believe.

Now, La La Land. Mia, played by Emma Stone, is a struggling actress. She’s single and lightly dating, but her main focus is on becoming famous. That’s her Goal, a pretty strong one, I might add. But what is her need? The only thing I could come up with was her need to stay humble, even as she conquers her world. When she was a barista at a coffee shop on a studio lot, she loved that a particular famous actress refused a free cup of coffee. This is Mia’s standard to live by. At the end, when she’s finally made it, a similar thing happens as she now gets coffee. She’s the one everybody is starry eyed over in the coffee shop, and she is the one who now refuses the free cup of coffee and insists on paying. Is this a strong enough Need?


I liked the movie a lot. The singing and dancing reminded me of my favorite movies back in the MGM days, as it was designed to do. The story line was okay, but still, I would cheer for it a lot more if Mia had expressed a deeper Secret Desire than to be loved by millions and still stay humble. Sebastian was no better. I couldn’t separate his Secret Desire from his Goal, to open his own jazz club. Jazz was his life, his goal, his need to survive, everything. Really? Maybe I’ve been too spoiled with Happily Ever Afters and Romantic Comedies where the character arc starts down here and lands up there. Maybe La La Land was supposed to be just what it was. A real-life portrayal of two jaded people driven by the only lifestyle they knew. Nah! There was something missing and that’s why I chose Hidden Figures for my Best Movie of the weekend award.


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

The Tree Plotter

On Monday, I laid out my Tree Plotter method of plotting. I'm pretty excited about it. Just last night the gboy and I were watching Disney's Pinoccio. It even worked for that! I will lay this movie out in the Tree Plotter in a future article.

The thing about the Tree Plotter is that it gives you a skeleton of your character, but also helps you breathe life into him. In the tree analogy, we take a dormant tree and bring life to it. We connect the theme with all of the branches so the character is consistent throughout. We also connect the Inner Need (or Secret Desire) branch with the Lesson/Decision, and we connect the Inciting Incident with the Bleakest Moment. This is to be sure we have a well-developed character, (well-trimmed tree ) that makes sense to the reader.

Enough with the tree talk, let's get to it!

Future films to look forward to:

  • Hidden Figures
  • La La Land
  • The BFG
  • Divergent
  • Insurgent
  • Inside Out
  • Old Fashioned
  • The Hundred Foot Journey
  • The Martian
  • And many others!


Here is the text I copied from my last post so the Tree Plotter can be found easily.

. . . I have developed a method of skeleton plotting that is blowing my socks off. I practice it on almost every movie I see, and am amazed how true it is. Now, when I say developed, I mean I borrowed a little from this writing instructor and a little from that writing instructor. You get the point. See below to get the full list of resources I’ve used.


As the title of the method suggests, I’ve taken the skeleton of a tree. . .

 . . .And filled it out like this.
Descriptions of these are as follows:
  •      Theme – Every story needs a theme. It is here on the Tree PlotterTM under the surface as a fertilizer that will feed every aspect of the tree. Themes are usually one word or a short phrase, i.e. Forgiveness, Redemption, Going Home. There could be more than one theme, but there should always be one central theme for the entire story.
  •       Inner Need – The Inner Need, or Secret Desire, rarely changes. Dorothy’s need was to be loved and appreciated. This never changed throughout the movie.
  •       Inciting Incident – Usually happens at the end of the first act, which deals mostly with setting the character up in her ordinary world. It’s also described as Crossing the Threshold, or the Door of No Return. For Dorothy, the inciting incident was quite obviously the tornado. She literally stepped over the threshold of her home—never to return in the same manner—and into a world of living color.
  •     Tent Pole Moment – I really wish I could call this something else in keeping with my tree analogy, but this is so perfect. Noted editor, author, and artist Jeff Gerke came up with this brilliant word picture. If you think of a circus tent, what holds up the canvas in the middle? The tall tent pole. It keeps the middle from sagging, which is what we’re trying to do by installing the tent pole smack into the middle of our story, or the middle of Act Two. When your story sags in the middle, kind of fizzles out for the reader, they stop reading. The tent pole can be a paradigm shift in the story, something to make the reader go, “Wait a minute!” and continue to read. It also always seems to involve a death, either literally, emotionally, or figuratively. Because, let’s face it, what better way to throw a dogleg into a story than by killing something. Note that the Tent Pole connects directly to the ground, and to the fertilizer, aka the theme. I don’t see this in a lot of stories, but there are some examples where the Tent Pole relates in some way to the theme. If you can pull this off, you’re on your way to a well-rounded, fully plotted story. Dorothy’s Tent Pole Moment was when she was captured by the witch and threatened with death. (See what I did there? Death.) In Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, Luke’s Tent Pole Moment is when they were about to die in the garbage masher. I recently saw an opposite tent pole when watching Tarzan II, the Disney animated prequel to Tarzan. (It was my ten-year-old grandson’s choice, but I kinda liked it.) In the middle of the movie, when everyone thought that the child Tarzan, who had run away, was now dead. His friends find out otherwise and go tell his ape mother who is grieving. She immediately sets out to find him, creating a shift in the story and giving the audience hope that Tarzan will be found. It still involves a death, but one that isn’t a death, if that makes sense. Well, it did to me at the time.
  •       Bleakest Moment – Just as it sounds. Nowhere to turn. All hope is lost. For Dorothy, it was when the balloon floated away without her thanks to her little dog and the only cat (apparently) in the land of Oz. This should happen at the end of the second act to kick off the third where the conclusion will happen. Just as the Tent Pole should tap into the Theme, the Bleakest Moment should reflect the Inciting Incident. This is why the branches are echoed on each side of the tree. Dorothy’s Inciting Incident was the tornado that blew her out of Kansas. Now, she has an alternative way to get back home, but alas, it’s not to be.
  •      The Lesson/Decision – This is an either/or scenario. Either the character learns a valuable lesson, thus completing her character arc for the better, or makes a decision to stay the way they are. Dorothy learned a valuable lesson that I still carry with me years after I first saw the movie on our brand-new color TV in the 60’s. There is no place like home. In the recent movie, La La Land, which I’ll be talking about at a later date, Mia and Sebastian make their own decisions: To keep on their trajectory and follow their dreams, even at the cost of their relationship. Note that according to the Tree Plotter, the Lesson/Decision should reflect the Inner Need. Dorothy needed a place where she was loved and appreciated. She found that right in her own backyard. Mia’s Inner Need, her Secret Desire, was to stay humble when she made it big. When she decides to pursue her career and she does become famous, we see her being kind to the barista, just as she had witnessed another famous actress doing in her own coffee shop when she was a struggling actress.


I plan to talk about the tree plotter a lot. Either here or on the Facebook page. There will be other aspects of the craft of writing, as well, but this Tree Plotter thing is where I’m living right now. I might as well build one of those fancy tree houses and settle a spell.

*Resources that led to the development of the Tree Plotter TM:




Monday, March 20, 2017

Hello, boys. I'm baaack!

“Hello, boys. I’m baaaack!” This quote, as spoken by Randy Quaid’s character, the drunken crop duster Russell Casse, in the movie Independence Day, seems apropos as it has been two years to the day since my last confess—I mean, entry. While I’ve never been abducted by aliens, (to my knowledge,) I have been abducted by life. But I’m back, and hopefully ready to discuss many, many movies with you.

There are a couple of new items on my agenda for this post. The first is to let you know that I have created a Facebook page for Craft Cinema. https://www.facebook.com/CrftCinema/ The blog posts will be announced there, and I’m also going to post short observations. We will be readily able to discuss on the Facebook page, more so than on the blog article.

The other thing is that I have developed a method of skeleton plotting that is blowing my socks off. I practice it on almost every movie I see, and am amazed how true it is. Now, when I say developed, I mean I borrowed a little from this writing instructor and a little from that writing instructor. You get the point. See below to get the full list of resources I’ve used.


As the title of the method suggests, I’ve taken the skeleton of a tree. . .

 . . .And filled it out like this.
Descriptions of these are as follows:
  •      Theme – Every story needs a theme. It is here on the Tree PlotterTM under the surface as a fertilizer that will feed every aspect of the tree. Themes are usually one word or a short phrase, i.e. Forgiveness, Redemption, Going Home. There could be more than one theme, but there should always be one central theme for the entire story.
  •       Inner Need – The Inner Need, or Secret Desire, rarely changes. Dorothy’s need was to be loved and appreciated. This never changed throughout the movie.
  •       Inciting Incident – Usually happens at the end of the first act, which deals mostly with setting the character up in her ordinary world. It’s also described as Crossing the Threshold, or the Door of No Return. For Dorothy, the inciting incident was quite obviously the tornado. She literally stepped over the threshold of her home—never to return in the same manner—and into a world of living color.
  •     Tent Pole Moment – I really wish I could call this something else in keeping with my tree analogy, but this is so perfect. Noted editor, author, and artist Jeff Gerke came up with this brilliant word picture. If you think of a circus tent, what holds up the canvas in the middle? The tall tent pole. It keeps the middle from sagging, which is what we’re trying to do by installing the tent pole smack into the middle of our story, or the middle of Act Two. When your story sags in the middle, kind of fizzles out for the reader, they stop reading. The tent pole can be a paradigm shift in the story, something to make the reader go, “Wait a minute!” and continue to read. It also always seems to involve a death, either literally, emotionally, or figuratively. Because, let’s face it, what better way to throw a dogleg into a story than by killing something. Note that the Tent Pole connects directly to the ground, and to the fertilizer, aka the theme. I don’t see this in a lot of stories, but there are some examples where the Tent Pole relates in some way to the theme. If you can pull this off, you’re on your way to a well-rounded, fully plotted story. Dorothy’s Tent Pole Moment was when she was captured by the witch and threatened with death. (See what I did there? Death.) In Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, Luke’s Tent Pole Moment is when they were about to die in the garbage masher. I recently saw an opposite tent pole when watching Tarzan II, the Disney animated prequel to Tarzan. (It was my ten-year-old grandson’s choice, but I kinda liked it.) In the middle of the movie, when everyone thought that the child Tarzan, who had run away, was now dead. His friends find out otherwise and go tell his ape mother who is grieving. She immediately sets out to find him, creating a shift in the story and giving the audience hope that Tarzan will be found. It still involves a death, but one that isn’t a death, if that makes sense. Well, it did to me at the time.
  •       Bleakest Moment – Just as it sounds. Nowhere to turn. All hope is lost. For Dorothy, it was when the balloon floated away without her thanks to her little dog and the only cat (apparently) in the land of Oz. This should happen at the end of the second act to kick off the third where the conclusion will happen. Just as the Tent Pole should tap into the Theme, the Bleakest Moment should reflect the Inciting Incident. This is why the branches are echoed on each side of the tree. Dorothy’s Inciting Incident was the tornado that blew her out of Kansas. Now, she has an alternative way to get back home, but alas, it’s not to be.
  •      The Lesson/Decision – This is an either/or scenario. Either the character learns a valuable lesson, thus completing her character arc for the better, or makes a decision to stay the way they are. Dorothy learned a valuable lesson that I still carry with me years after I first saw the movie on our brand-new color TV in the 60’s. There is no place like home. In the recent movie, La La Land, which I’ll be talking about at a later date, Mia and Sebastian make their own decisions: To keep on their trajectory and follow their dreams, even at the cost of their relationship. Note that according to the Tree Plotter, the Lesson/Decision should reflect the Inner Need. Dorothy needed a place where she was loved and appreciated. She found that right in her own backyard. Mia’s Inner Need, her Secret Desire, was to stay humble when she made it big. When she decides to pursue her career and she does become famous, we see her being kind to the barista, just as she had witnessed another famous actress doing in her own coffee shop when she was a struggling actress.


I plan to talk about the tree plotter a lot. Either here or on the Facebook page. There will be other aspects of the craft of writing, as well, but this Tree Plotter thing is where I’m living right now. I might as well build one of those fancy tree houses and settle a spell.

*Resources that led to the development of the Tree Plotter TM:



Friday, March 20, 2015

The Plucky Heroine and the Disinterested Hero



Do you love a good romance? What do you like about it? Are you drawn to the stories where both parties fall in love at the same time? Or when one must pursue the other?


Merely PlayersAdmittedly, I love it when there’s tension. But that’s not always easy to put on the page when you, as the author, know these two need to be together. In my first romance novel, Merely Players, I had a
hard time keeping my hero and heroine apart. Yes, she was angry with him for forgetting about her after high school when he became a huge A-list actor. Yes, she resisted him at every turn once they reunited at the aquarium where she worked. But, I’d be writing a scene, and before long they’d be in each other’s arms. I’d have to throw a conflict in there to get them mad at each other again. However, it didn’t last long. Then I’d have to do it again. This writing business is tough, I tell ya.

I had the opposite problem when I wrote Crossroads Bay, the second book of three in the Oregon Weddings series.CrossroadsBay Paul, a caterer, falls for Meranda, a charter boat captain, but she doesn’t feel the same. She has an agenda looking for her family’s treasure and no one was going to stand in the way of it. I struggled to get these two together. And it wasn’t until Meranda had just hit rock-bottom, and was seeking comfort food in Paul’s restaurant, that she finally saw him as the hero I had created him to be. She looked at me (yes, my characters talk to me…don’t judge,) and said, “Kathy, why didn’t you tell me he was so gorgeous!” After a palm-slap to my forehead, I went back through the story and was then able to write in glimmers of attraction on her end.

After writing that first romance, I thought it would be smart to study how the greats do it. I became frustrated as Scarlett rebuffed Rhett’s advances over and over in Gone With the Wind. I cried as Tony and Maria in West Side Story were torn apart by their families. I puzzled how Joe Bradley and Princess Anne in Roman Holiday would ever get together when he was a lowly reporter, and she was royalty. And much, much more research!

What makes a good romance? Is it when the two are mutually drawn to each other but kept apart by circumstance as in The Lake House, a love story where the two characters are living in different pockets of time? Is it the tension of bringing two unlikely people together and watching one struggle as the other remains clueless as in Gigi? Or is it when two strong characters fight the attraction until it becomes obvious that they must be together?

I’d like to talk about Prudy Perkins and Jason McCullough, played by Joan Hackett and James Garner in the Western comedy, Support Your Local Sheriff. Prudy is the mayor’s daughter who has just come into a shocking amount of money via the gold she discovers at the cemetery as they’re burying someone. Jason is the drifter who makes no secret that basically he’s on his way to Australia. Prudy is, of course, attracted to Jason from the beginning. I mean, look at him! It’s James Garner! But she’s also the plucky heroine. Everything has to be her idea, on her timeline.

Following are some of the exchanges between these two:

When they first meet, Prudy is engaging in a street brawl and covered in mud. She sees Jason, hefts a board over her shoulder like a baseball bat, and says, “What about you?”

He backs up and says, “What about me?”

Searching for some reason to involve him in the fight, she says, “You’re too clean.”

He then moves away quickly before she rectifies that.

***

Their next encounter is after Jason is made sheriff of the town and is on his way to the mayor’s house where he has been promised room and board. Prudy is in the kitchen in her long-handled red underwear, still a muddy mess and washing her hair. She sees Jason and her father come toward the house and panics. Instead of running to her room, which would be way less funny, she scoots out the back and ends up in the tree in her front yard. Jason comes out, spots her, and says, “You’re the strangest girl I ever met.” She says, “Go away,” and pulls her hair over her face.

***

Prudy is finally cleaned up, her hair atop her head and wearing a pretty ruffled blouse and a skirt with a bustle. She’s making biscuits and touches her face, unknowingly leaving a powdery mess. As she backs into the stove, her skirt catches fire. She doesn’t notice it until she carries the meal out to the dining room, and Jason douses her with a whole pitcher of water. Tears trickle over her floured cheeks as she whines, “I’m sick and tired of these things happening to me.” She shakes her fist in Jason’s face. “And somebody better do something about it. Soon!” Then she storms away.

***

That evening, Jason comes home and she invites him to sit with her on the porch so she can explain the stupid, silly things he’s seen her do. She tells him she felt it was dumb to have such an attractive man think she was a hopeless loony. After some light banter, and him telling her that she’s a pretty girl who loves to put her cards on the table, he says, “Why, any man would love to take you on a picnic or out for a walk in the evening. But if you’re thinking of anything more serious, I’ve got to lay my cards on the table. I’m on my way to Australia and just passing through.”

She gets her hackles up and says, “Who cares where you’re on your way to?”

He defends himself. “Well, any girl thinking of entering into any permanent relationshi—”

Interrupting him, she calls him conceited and storms back into the house, wreaking havoc by the sounds of the crashing and the cursing as she apparently keeps bumping into things in the dark.

***

A few days later, she has asked him to go for a carriage ride in the country. They get out and have a discussion near a tree. At this point, Jason has arrested Joe Danby, played by Bruce Dern, for murder. Joe is the youngest son of the meanest man in town. She tells him that Pa Danby, played by Walter Brennan, is rallying his extended family to bust Joe out of jail. She asks Jason what he plans to do about it. He tells her he thinks he’ll leave town. She can’t believe what she’s hearing. He reminds her, once again, that he’s never made a secret of the fact that basically he’s on his way to Australia, and “quite frankly, I don’t like the odds.”

She surprises him by saying she thinks that’s one of the most mature things she’s ever heard of a man doing. “Any other man,” she says, “would stick around to prove they’re mature.”

He asks, “You don’t think it sounded a little cowardly?”

“No, I told you. It’s mature.”

He begins to back peddle. “It sounded a little cowardly when I said it.”

She digs in. “Well, it isn’t. It’s mature.”

He shakes his head. “I’m surprised at a girl who will keep throwing herself at a man when she secretly thinks he’s a coward.”

“Throwing myself at you?”

“Did you really think I was going to turn tail and run at the first sign of trouble?”

“But,” she stammers, “that’s what you just said you were going to do.”

“Well, I’m not going to, so you can just forget about it.” He walks away, leaving her to wonder what just happened.

Throughout the movie, they both play it very close to the vest, neither of them whispering sweet-nothings or shamelessly flirting. Rather, their banter as they argue with each other is what ironically draws them closer. By the end, we see a mutual respect, two worthy opponents. However, Jason gets in the last word as he rescues Prudy from some overage juveniles throwing firecrackers under her horse. He sweeps her up and while cradling her in his arms informs them that from now on if they messed with this girl they would be messing with his girl.

Prudy can’t leave it alone. “What do you mean your girl?”

Jason goes on. “Oh, come on. You’ve had that look in your eyes ever since I first hit town. Now, we’re going to have a little agreement. After we’re married, no matter how many kids we got, when I say we’re off to Australia, we pack up, kids and all, and head to Australia.”
Prudy asks, “What do I wanna go to Australia for?”

Jason says, “Because that's where your husband would be, and girls usually go where their husbands are.”
And that’s the proposal. The disinterested hero is finally interested, and the plucky heroine gets her man, despite herself.